Friday, September 29, 2017

Air Force general to racists:"Get out!"

SCREEN CAPTURE / MSNBC
Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria made it clear that racism and racists will not be tolerated at the U.S. Air Force Academy.

AFTER RACIAL SLURS with the message "Go Home" were scrawled outside the doors of African/American students' at the U.S. Air Force Academy's prep school, Superintendent Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria gathered all 4,000 cadets in a hall Thursday (Sept. 28) so they could hear his unequivocal denunciation of racism.


His message: Treat people with dignity and respect — or get out.

Racist slurs using the "n-word" were discovered on the doors of five African-American U.S. Air Force Academy Prep School cadets’ rooms earlier this week. The U.S. Air Force says it is investigating the incident.

The incident occurred one day following protests across NFL stadiums where some football players took a knee during the national anthem.


“The Academy’s Security Forces are looking into the matter. We’re unable to release any additional information at this time due to the ongoing investigation,” said Lt. Col. Allen Herritage, an Academy spokesman in a statement.

You could hear a pin drop as the general sternly made his point to the 5,500 in attendance. Towards the end of his speech, the Silveria said:

"Just in case you're unclear on where I stand on this topic, I'm going to leave you my most important thought today: If you can't treat someone with dignity and respect, then you need to get out. If you can't treat someone from another gender, whether that's a man or a woman, with dignity and respect, then you need to get out. If you demean someone in any way, then you need to get out. And if you can't treat someone from another race, or different color skin, with dignity and respect, then you need to get out."
In the speech he mentioned Ferguson, Charlottesville and the NFL protest. In an MSNBC interview he said that the cadets cannot separate themselves from the rest of the world.

The U.S. Air Force Academy Prep School is located on the same campus as the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The prep school is a one-year program for about 240 cadets who spend a year preparing to enter the U.S. Air Force Academy.

The Academy’s top officer said racism was a “red line” at the school, which produces nearly 1,000 graduates a year to serve as officers in the U.S. Air Force and vowed “significant repercussions.”

“It’s not who we are, nor will we tolerate it in any shape or fashion,” said Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria, superintendent of the U.S. Air Force Academy.

“The Air Force Academy strives to create a climate of dignity and respect for all — period — those who don’t understand that are behind the power curve and better catch up,” he added.

In conclusion, Silviera told the cadets to take out their smart phones and record his concluding statement so that they can have it with them always.

"If you can't treat someone with dignity and respect, then get out."
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